Breaking into the NHS

No, not burglary. Digital Catapult had a half-day event on “NHS: The Procurement Minefield” last Monday. The first speaker was Mahiben Maruthappu from NHS England, who listed six big challenges for the NHS, or things that are needed more of: prevention, innovation, self-care, breaking silos and scaling, IT interoperability, and making the financial case. (Most of these sound like they would fit any major organisation really…)

He then listed three focus areas: organisational change to handle new kinds of services and local innovations (no surprise there!), combining innovations to achieve synergies, and achieving national scale. In terms of medical issues, diabetes, cancer and mental health are the three big priorities for the next ten years.

The other speakers weren’t as interesting to my ears, but the panel discussion towards the end had some good nuggets. For example, in answer to a question about how best to get into the NHS as a new service provider, the answers included having inside knowledge, “talking clinical” (i.e. not just business and tech), having a global view, and being adaptable and having perseverance (expect that anything will take years…). Someone even called the NHS “the hardest market to crack”, and recommended going direct to consumers, even if you then have to go to the US and Australia.

Some food for thought there, though mostly confirming the impression I’ve already got from other health and medical startups about the difficulties involved in working (or trying to work, to be more precise?) with the UK national health care system.

An events event

Eventbrite did a survey of event organisers recently. I like surveys, so filled it in out of curiousity mainly. Ok, we do organise quite a few events with Club Soda so I did have genuine responses to offer to the survey.

The survey results are now out, there was also a big event at the Methodist Central Hall one morning last week to announce them. The report findings aren’t that relevant to me or Club Soda, as the responses and focus is more on much bigger things than what I’m involved in organising. But the panel discussion at the event had some interesting nuggets. Such as that not many people think SEO is among the most important event marketing tools for them, when it really should be, at least according to Eventbrite. Apparently they pay a lot of attention to the way their event pages look like to search engines.

Some other points that we’ve also come across were confirmed. For example that email is still the most important method of communication, and that 50% is a good rule of thumb when you try to estimate the drop-out rate between people signing up for events and those actually turning up (for free events at least, paid-for are not quite that bad of course).

And buzzwords that got mentioned enough times for me to wrote them down were: Content! Experiences! Storytelling! Community! User experience! Similarly, “learning from selfies” is a thing: according to one panelist a good aim for an event organiser is to “create selfie opportunities”.